16 Replies Latest reply: Aug 17, 2015 7:47 PM by peds48 RSS

When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.

dtv8000

When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.  Comcast is coming out with their x1 4k capable receiver later this year.


I know they will be doing steaming content for the Olympics.  Is the only way to get this on a tv is to hook a pc up to it? I don't know if DNLA can even stream it.

  • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
    dcd

    Here's an article you may find enlightening.

    DirecTV Preps for 4K | Light Reading

  • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
    kingwr12

    I am hoping that new equipment is not required. Hopefully new 4K content will become available and can be viewed/recorded on my HR44. I should just need the 4K TV (and maybe a new HDMI cable with better specs.) How it ends up working/looking on the RVU clients is a different story, however.

    • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
      dcd

      You apparently didn't read the article I linked.  All new equipment will be required, including a 4K TV.

       


      • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
        kingwr12

        I did not read it in detail. Is that a prerequisite for posting to these forums?  There was no technical reason given for the need for new STBs. It's all just H.264 content being decoded and sent to the TV. Perhaps instead of chastising posters for not thoroughly reading, you can share some of your "expert" knowledge as to why new equipment is required.

        • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
          dcd

          kingwr12 wrote:

           

          I did not read it in detail. Is that a prerequisite for posting to these forums?

          No, not a prerequisite, but if you wish to join a conversation in progress it's always nice to be more or less informed.  You can always start a new fresh thread and then there wouldn't be any need to "catch up".  In any event, I don't know any of the deep technical details of 4K, but I do know this.  All modern TV's are fixed pixel, so a 1080p TV can only display in 1080p resolution.  The TV has electronics that convert other resolutions to 1080p but I'm confident that mine doesn't have any capability of handling a 4K resolution signal.  I assume the same is true of much of the equipment throughout the system.  Note that when HD came along, it required a new set top box and dish.  I seriously doubt the current group of HD STBs don't have the processing power to handle 4K.

          • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
            rolldog

            Not sure how many people know this, I didn't find out until yesterday, but DIRECTV came out with a mini genie receiver that broadcasts 4K content. You no longer have to have a Samsung 4K TV with RVU technology. The only requirement is the port must be HDMI 2.0 & HDCP 2.2, which every 4K TV has. Installer is coming out tomorrow to hook it up.

             

            That's the problem with running the audio/video through an audio receiver. Most audio receivers, unless it's fairly new, don't have port that are HDMI 2.0 and HDCP 2.2 compatible. So, anyone who has a 4K TV, but doesn't have a Samsung RVU 4K TV, can now watch 4K content from DIRECTV. I was told they have a few channels of regular programming plus a couple of PPV channels, so it sounds like it's setup like the 3D channels were.

            • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
              peds48

              There are some incorrect stamens on your post.  First, not all 4K TVs have HDCP 2.2, and second DIRECTV has none, zero 4K linear channels, only content available on 4K currently are two 4K promos and some overpriced PPVs.

              • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
                rolldog

                HDCP 2.2 originated specifically for the protection of 4K content. This is why every TV manufacturer has HDCP 2.2 incorporated into their TVs. Any display that doesn't have HDCP 2.2 but can show 4K content is called a monitor. Yea, for your computer. Please, give me the make and model of any TV that is classified as a 4K TV but doesn't have HDCP 2.2.

                 

                Well, I'm having a DIRECTV 4K receiver installed tomorrow. I already have a Samsung RVU TV, but now I get to watch 4K content on my 2013 Sony 4K TV. You should research this a little more.

                • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
                  peds48

                  rolldog wrote:

                   

                  rolldog

                  You should research this a little more.

                  "research" is my middle name....lol

                   

                  When the first batch of 4K TVs came about, all there was was streaming content from the net, matter you can certainly say that not much have changed.  You can have a 4K display to stream from YT, Amazon, Netflix etc, without needing HDCP 2.2, even RVU does not need HDCP 2,2.  Those early adapters will be disappointed when they find that their 4K TV does not have HDCP 2.2 on their almost new 4K display.

                   

                  If you jumped on the Ultra HD bandwagon when 4K TVs and media devices first hit stores in 2013, don’t assume your purchases support HDCP 2.2 and will work with future 4K devices and content—most of those early models don’t and won’t. To further muddy the picture as it were, HDMI 2.0 support, which is also required for TVs and devices to play 4K video, does not guarantee HDCP 2.2 compatibility. In fact, though there are many HDMI 2.0 compliant A/V receivers in stores right now, most do not support the new copy protection.


                  http://www.techhive.com/article/2881620/4k-content-protection-will-frustrate-consumers-more-than-pirates-meet-hdcp-22.html


                  I leave the rest of the research up to you, since you need it badly!

                  • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
                    rolldog

                    I agree with you as far as audio/video receivers go. That's what I mentioned in my first post. I asked for you to name 1 make/model of any 4K TV that was not HDCP 2.2 compliant,and you have yet to do that. That's because they do not exist.

                     

                    Yes, I was an early adopter and purchased a Sony 65" 4K TV when they were first released, and I've bought 5 more since then. Even the Sony I purchased in 2013,with the FMP-X10, has 1 port on it which is both HDMI 2.0 & HDCP 2.2 compliant. Now, the TV doesn’t have built-in H.265 encoding, which is probably where you're getting confused, but every 4K TV in existence is HDCP 2.2 compliant. If a TV wasn't HDCP 2.2 compliant, then it wouldn't be able to show Netflix or any other copy protected content. The royalties on H.265 are 5x higher than H.264 royalties.

                     

                    Intel collects royalties from every device made that wants to be HDCP "High Definition Copyright Protection" 2.2 compliant, which is every single 4K TV in existence and every single device in existence that wants to broadcast copyright 4K content, because if it wasn't HDCP 2.2 compliant all it would broadcast is non-copyright content like a picture you took with your own camera.

                     

                    It's ok, a lot of people get these confused. Please list a 4K TV for me that is NOT HDCP 2.2 compliant, and after you get tired of looking go to www.digital-cp.com,the home of Digital Content Protection LLC and read up. I'll be watching 4K content on my brand new 4K DIRECTV receiver, which is being installed tomorrow,  so I'll now have 3 devices to broadcast content to my 2013 4K TV. I'll post some pictures of the channel guide and the channels I get in 4K for anyone who might be interested in getting 4K content through DIRECTV.   :)

                    • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
                      rolldog

                      I'm sorry, High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP). Made a mistake. High definition wouldn't be specific to 4K content.

                    • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
                      peds48

                      If a TV wasn't HDCP 2.2 compliant, then it wouldn't be able to show Netflix or any other copy protected content


                      Oh my goodness, you are so confused buddy, HDCP only applies to HDMI, so a TV not having HDCP 2.2 can perfectly play 4K Netflix, Amazon, RVU etc

                    • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
                      peds48

                      I'll post some pictures of the channel guide and the channels I get in 4K


                      Again, you are lost buddy, as I said, the  only 4K content is on channel (VOD) 1102, I know, I am tired of watching the promos and some of the PPV.  There is zero linear channels for 4K

                    • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
                      peds48

                      I agree with you as far as audio video receivers go. That's what I mentioned in my first post. I asked for you to name 1 make model of any 4K TV that was not HDCP 2.2 compliant and you have yet to do that. That's because they do not exist.


                      I guess you miss the big elephant in the room, all TV before the mandated date of Sep 2014, were not required to be HDCP 2,2 complaint.  So any 4K made BEFORE Sep 2014, may be HDMI 2,0 but not necessary HDCP 2,2, further  If you have 10 Gbps HDMI 2,0  HDCP 2,2, you'll still be able to watch 4K at 60 Fps, you will just be limited to 4-2-2 instead of the higher chroma options  4;4;4.  The older chips back then were all either 10.2Gbps HDMI 2.0  HDCP 2.2 or 18 Gbps HDMI 2.0  HDCP 1.4

      • Re: When is direct tv getting 4k equipment.
        kingwr12

        I did not read it in detail. Is that a prerequisite for posting to these forums?  There was no technical reason given for the need for new STBs. It's all just H.264 content being decoded and sent to the TV. Perhaps instead of chastising posters for not thoroughly reading, you can share some of your "expert" knowledge as to why new equipment is required.