6 Replies Latest reply: Jan 25, 2014 5:11 PM by spionnadh RSS

Due for an upgrade. Need help in planning

drockspnd

Where should i turn for information on your new equipment options?

I tried customer service and became frustrated with there limited knowledge (along with my limited knowledge)

Customer since 2001. No new equipment for 3+ years.

Im having  a tough time understanding how all the new equipment and technologies work together.

I have 3 main viewing areas (living room, basement, bedroom) with 3 secondary areas (kitchen, gym, kids loft).

Genie? Wireless? Directv Ready TVs? Any way to 'mirror' service into secondary area?

 

Any direction or ideas would be great.

  • Re: Due for an upgrade. Need help in planning
    litzdog911

    What DirecTV equipment do you currently have?

  • Re: Due for an upgrade. Need help in planning
    dcd

    And, how many of those six locations have a HD TV?  Also note that although mirroring programming is possible, it is a non standard install and is not set up or supported by Directv.

  • Re: Due for an upgrade. Need help in planning
    carl6

    Assuming you have/want HD service and DVR capability...

     

    The latest equipment is referred to as Genie and client.  A Genie is a DVR with 5 tuners, as well as a server to up to three clients. There are two model numbers for Genie, HR34 and HR44 (with the HR44 being a little newer), but both are considered Genie by DirecTV (i.e., you cannot choose which of those two models you will get).

     

    If you currently have one or more DVRs, and one or more HD receivers, you won't gain a great deal by upgrading. Knowing your current setup will let us give specific comparisons.

     

    As to extending service to additional locations, each viewing location requires a DVR, receiver, client, or television that is able to function directly as a client (certain models of Samsung mostly). Regardless of what you choose, each viewing location will have a monthly mirroring fee (in other words, $6 per month per viewing location regardless of what type of equipment you put there).  There may or may not be an installation fee for additional locations (and each location will require a coax cable being run to the location).

     

    There is a wireless client in development, but I do not believe it is generally available yet. That would allow adding a location without having to run a coax cable to the location.

  • Re: Due for an upgrade. Need help in planning
    spionnadh

    Real simple, get the Genie plus a "mini" for every room. You won't be able to have more than 3 "mini" receivers on at once but I am assuming that you probably don't have all the TV's going at once.

     

    While Mirroring is not supported by DTV most installers can and will do it for a custom charge.

     

    If you want to keep any of your existing equipment or don't like the idea of only being able to turn on 3 clients (mini) at any given time keep this in mind. Any non DVR (except clients) use 1 tuner slot to operate. All regular (non genie) DVR's use 2 tuner slots. All Genie DVR's use 5 tuner slots. The most number of tuners that a standard SWM system can support is 8 tuner slots. If you go above the 8 available tuner slots with your equipment, your system will need to be "Upgraded" to a SWM 16 multiswitch, thus allowing the utilization of 16 SWM tuner slots. This involves retrograding your dish down from just one line to 4 lines coming off of it (keep in mind that a burial fee will apply at a rate of $1 per foot past 20') and a large multiswitch (the SWM16 unit) installed that then uses 2 smaller SWM multiswitches to provide the DTV signal to your house lines. It sounds complicated but is fairly simple, just time consuming.

     

    In my opinion upgrading to one Genie and all mini genie's is the way to go because it allows for the operation of DVR functions on every TV, and uses one central hard drive for the recording of programs and VOD. The more equipment that is needed to make any given system operate means that there is that much more that could possibly fail, making it that much harder to trouble shoot.