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h20cowpoke's profile

Contributor

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2 Messages

Sun, Oct 29, 2017 5:33 PM

RG6 coaxial cable difference

Have run RCA RG6 coaxial throughout my home, (print on cable[ RG/6 CATV 2300MHz CATV/CL2]). Had direct tv technician come to my home and tell me their cable is better and that I need to re-run all the cable with their cable. How can I tell the difference? All I can see is there's has directv printed on the outer jacket. Both are RG/6 18 gauge solid copper core.

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Official Solution

TexasBrit

ACE - Expert

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13.4K Messages

3 y ago

sloppywindchime - that's an incorrect reply.  SWM frequencies only run to 1790 and using a DVR makes no difference at all. Directv specifies 3GHz cable not because it is needed but because they might as well. Even if there were signals above 2300 the cable would still work, the worst that could happen is a slight signal loss at higher frequencies.

Even solid copper core isn't a technical requirement for most installations. the only difference between copper clad and solid copper is thet solid copper has a reduced power loss, and this only matters if you have a long run carrying power (usually that only applies to the cable to an SWM LNB at the dish.). But we all use solid coppewr for that run because we can. And DirecTV specifies it as an insurance policy for very long power-carrying cable runs.

there are a lot of installer "urban legends" about cable and connectors. We see them here all the time. Most of them have no basis in fact. Your other response about power inserters is another one. Using a 29v PI instead of a 21v PI will have no detrimental effects because of the way the SWM handles power. In fact, many people use a 29v PI for long SWM runs because the additional voltage overcomes any voltage loss in the cable.

litzdog911

ACE - Sage

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40.8K Messages

4 y ago

That coax cable is fine.  No need to replace it!

Contributor

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2 Messages

4 y ago

Thanks for the info. That helps greatly.

Contributor

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1 Message

3 y ago

Channel Master RG6 HDTV Coaxial Cable is cheap and of good quality. It is weatherproof, making them okay to use in the outdoors. You can also be installed in walls and have aluminium shielding. They are F-type connectors like all others in their league and are perfect for digital satellite, TV signals, antennae.

Mentor

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30 Messages

3 y ago

Incorrect. DirecTV runs RG6 3 Ghz cabling and if you are using a genie system or a DVR it requires all the bandwidth to work correctly. 2.3 Ghz is not enough since the genie stacks 5 tuners on a single line. I've been installing satellite tv for 6 years now and cabling is the biggest issue. If the tech could use it he would. It has to be 3 Ghz cabling with a solid copper core. I can't tell you how many service issues I've fixed simply by running the correct cabling.

New Member

1 y ago

My router is on one side of the house and the TV is on the other. I have tried a Wi-Fi repeater and it is not consistent. I have also tried a power line however my circuits are not all on the same line throughout the house. I was reading about MOCA and doing so I saw that a 2 connected home adapters by DirecTV DCAU 1R0-01 would work on both sides of the cable plugging direct into the ethernet of my modem and TV. Does it matter what RG6 cable I use?

The connected home adapter transfers coax into ethernet and has a power supply that you plug in or use USB.

shannon02

ACE - Expert

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15.3K Messages

You need two DECA BBs the ones with a power supply either an A/C power brick or USB.  AFAIK either type of RG6 coax will work.  This of course is not a DTV approved use of the DECA BBs so they will not service it.

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